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Harvilla writes about music and other pop culture. He lives in Columbus, Ohio, and was alive in the ’80s.

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: Madonna Strikes a Pose

The history of ‘Vogue’ and Madonna’s decade, with an assist from The New York Times’ Caryn Ganz

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: Coolio, “Weird Al” Yankovic, and the Struggle to Be Taken Seriously

Exploring ‘Gangsta’s Paradise’ and the history of pop rap in the early 1990s through the prism of Coolio’s most serious—and biggest—song

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: Going the Distance With Cake

Exploring the history of the droll kings of Sacramento with help from Sadie Dupuis

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A Salute to Ginger: Saying Farewell to the Latest Phase of Conan O’Brien

The late-night legend signs off from TBS tonight

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: It’s Time for the Pavement Episode

Chris Ryan joins Rob to discuss 'Gold Soundz,' ’90s indie rock, and getting a little cooler by discovering the hardest-working slackers in music

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: The Cold War of ‘The Boy Is Mine’

Monica and Brandy had one of the biggest hits of the decade. They also had one of the biggest feuds that never quite came to pass.

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In Praise of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Asshole and ‘Semi-Charmed Life’

Max Collins from Eve 6 joins the show to talk about one of the most infamous jerks in alt-rock—and one of its catchiest songs

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: How Sinéad O’Connor Turned a Prince Song Into Her Classic

The Purple One wrote ‘Nothing Compares 2 U,’ but O’Connor managed to inhabit the song and make it fully her own

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‘60 Songs That Explain the ’90s’: The Eternal Bounce of ‘Back That Azz Up’

On today’s show, we’re headed to New Orleans for Juvenile’s classic single and Cash Money Records’ big breakout

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How SoundScan Changed Everything We Knew About Popular Music

Thirty years ago, Billboard changed the way it tabulated its charts, turning the industry on its head and making room for genres once considered afterthoughts to explode in the national consciousness