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Eight Burning Questions Ahead of the 2020 Masters

Will Bryson DeChambeau actually break Augusta National? What are Tiger Woods’s chances of defending his title? And who will end up with the green jacket? That and more ahead of a November Masters.

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Songs of Love and Hate: “Layla” and Martin Scorsese’s ‘Goodfellas’

Thirty years later, the coda to the Derek and the Dominos classic haunts Scorsese’s crime epic

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Ten Things to Watch for in the 2020 PGA Championship

The first major of the golf season starts Thursday, and it promises a beautiful Bay Area course, rejuvenated play from Tiger, and new layers to the Brooks-Bryson feud

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Difficult Man: Anthony Bourdain’s ‘Kitchen Confidential,’ 20 Years Later

Bourdain’s incendiary industry tell-all was at once a colossal act of mythmaking and self-flagellating demystification

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What a Long, Strange Funny Trip ‘The Trip’ Series Has Been

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan bring their midlife crisis travelogue back for another hilarious, heartbreaking spin around Europe

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‘Wowee Zowee’ Was Pavement’s Misunderstood Masterpiece

Back in 1995, it sounded like the indie rock band was turning their back on mainstream success. Turns out they were just ahead of their time.

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Missing Baseball? Watch ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’

Richard Linklater’s 2016 homage to baseball, teamwork, and self-actualization is the perfect pastime salve

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Elvis Costello’s ‘Get Happy!!’ at 40

The 1980 album stands as a portrait of an artist bursting at the seams with creativity and coming apart over controversy

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The American Carnage of the Drive-By Truckers

The long-running group return to take stock of a nation on the brink, its institutions in peril, and its citizenry increasingly polarized, and wonder: What’s a Southern rock band to do in the twilight of the American experiment?

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The Siren Sound of the Clash’s ‘London Calling,’ 40 Years Later

Released in 1979, the Clash’s third album changed everything—punk rock, the band that made it, and the fans who worshiped it. Decades later, its rich, eclectic, propulsive sound hasn’t aged a minute, and its messages are as urgent as ever.